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Getting Prepared


 

Getting Prepared 2014 reports on recent high school graduates and developmental courses.

Getting Prepared 2014

What is remedial or developmental education?

In this report, "developmental education" is a term used to refer to programs offered by postsecondary institutions to prepare students for success in college-level work. "Developmental education," the term used in Minnesota Statutes 13.32, can imply courses which repeat material taught earlier that the student did not learn adequately the first time. For many educators, "developmental education" is a broader term that encompasses pre-college-level education and other academic support services that the student may benefit from for any reason. Developmental coursetaking encompasses the subject areas of mathematics, reading, writing, English as a Second Language or general study skills.

It should be noted that while postsecondary institutions typically assess the academic readiness of high school graduates for college level academic coursework, students can enroll in a variety of technical programs requiring less than college-level skills in reading, writing and/or math. Many students are able to graduate with postsecondary occupational certificates or diplomas and obtain a living wage job without being assessed college ready.



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Getting Prepared 2014

Report Summary Highlights

Unless otherwise indicated the term "college" is used to reference any type of postsecondary institution, including both academic and vocational training.

Overall, Minnesota does well in moving students from public high school to college. However, gaps in enrollment exist for key groups of students, including students of color and lower-income students.

Getting Prepared 2014 provides policymakers a more accurate measure of college readiness. The data clearly indicate that almost all graduates enrolling in developmental education are served by Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU). In fact, among enrollees at public two-year community and technical colleges, the percent of recent graduates needing developmental education increased; though, overall developmental education rates for the state are stable. This is, in part, due to a decrease in the percent of recent graduates at four-year colleges enrolling in developmental education. Disparities in enrollment in developmental education exist for key groups of students, again students of color, non-native speakers and lower-income students.

College Enrollment & Developmental Education

Most public high school graduates enrolled in college within two years after graduation and one in four enroll in developmental education during that same period. (Report page 19, 21)

Most public high school graduates enrolled in college within two years after graduation


Trends

Across all Minnesota colleges and universities, the percent of recent high school graduates who enrolled in developmental education has remained relatively stable at 28 to 30 percent between 2006 and 2011. (Report page 22)

The Percent of High School Graduates Enrolled in Developmental Courses Appears Stable (28%-30%) from 2006-2011

The percent of High School Graduates enrolled in Developmental Courses appears stable (28%-30%) from 2006-2011


Two-Year Colleges

State rates mask differences in developmental education course-taking within college sectors. (Report page 23)

Minnesota public two-year colleges have open admission policies and admit all students with a high school diploma in order to serve a larger population. This open admissions policy results in two-year colleges attracting students with a broad range of preparedness.

Percent of Recent Graduates Enrolled in Developmental Education Increasing at Minnesota Public Two-Year Colleges

Percent of Recent Graduates Enrolled in Developmental Education Increasing at Minnesota Public Two-Year Colleges


Four-Year Colleges

Public four-year colleges show a steady decrease in the percent of recent graduates participating in developmental education courses. (Report page 23)

Percent of Recent Graduates Enrolled in Developmental Education Decreasing at Four-Year Colleges

Percent of Recent Graduates Enrolled in Developmental Education Decreasing at Four-Year Colleges


First to Second Year Persistence

Students in developmental education persisted at rates comparable to other students. (Report page 34)

For the class of 2011, developmental education enrollees persisted in college at rates 2 to 4 percentage points higher than peers for every sector of postsecondary institution except at private not-for-profit institutions.

Developmental Education Students have Similar Persistence Rates Compared to Other Students

Developmental Education Students have Similar Persistence Rates Compared to Other Students


Developmental Courses by Student Demographics

Race/Ethnicity

2011 graduates of color enrolled at higher rates in developmental education than White students. (Report page 29)

High School Graduates of Color Enroll in Developmental Education at Rates Higher than Whites

High School Graduates of Color Enroll in Developmental Education at Rates Higher than Whites


Economic Status

2011 graduates enrolled in free price lunch had the highest rates of developmental education across Minnesota institutions (47%). The gap in developmental education enrollment between free lunch students and all other students was approximately 20 percentage points and appears to be increasing. (Report page 34)

Graduates Who Are Free or Reduced-Price Lunch Eligible Enroll in Developmental Education at Higher Rates

Graduates Who Are Free or Reduced-Price Lunch Eligible Enroll in Developmental Education at Higher Rates


High School Type Attended

2011 graduates from non-traditional schools enrolled in college at lower rates than graduates of traditional public high schools. (Report page 36)

Graduates of Non-Traditional High Schools Enroll in Developmental Education at Rates Higher than Peers

Graduates of Non-Traditional High Schools Enroll in Developmental Education at Rates Higher than Peers


ACT

The average ACT scores of students enrolled in developmental education are lower than the scores of the entering class as a whole. (Report page 39)

Developmental Education Students have lower average ACT Composite Scores than Average Graduate Enrolled

Developmental Education Students have lower average ACT Composite Scores than Average Graduate Enrolled


Data by individual public high school can be found in Appendix A (college enrollment) and Appendix B (developmental course-taking).

About Getting Prepared 2014

Getting Prepared fulfills the legislative mandate regarding developmental education data (Minnesota Statute 13.32, subdivisions 3 and 6). It provides summary information about Minnesota public high school graduates who enrolled in developmental courses within two years of their high school graduation at Minnesota postsecondary institutions.

Previous reports were limited to information about public high school graduates enrolled in developmental courses only at public institutionsMinnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) or the University of Minnesota. Getting Prepared 2014, includes new data on enrollments at Minnesota private colleges and out-of-state college enrollments and additional student demographic and high school academic performance data. Linking individual student level data on Minnesota public high school graduates from 2005 to 2012 with fall term Minnesota Office of Higher Education college enrollment data and full year enrollment data from the National Student Clearinghouse enabled the ability to provide additional data.

Data for the 2014 report was provided by the Minnesota Statewide Longitudinal Education Data System (SLEDS), managed jointly by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education (OHE), Minnesota Departments of Education (MDE) and Employment and Economic Development (DEED). SLEDS links student data from pre-kindergarten through completion of postsecondary and into the workforce to enable educators and policymakers to gauge the effectiveness of programs and design targeted improvement strategies.

Previous Getting Prepared Reports

The 2014 report is not fully comparable to previous reports prepared by the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the University of Minnesota.